Category Archives: curriculum

Advanced Learners

This year we are doing first grade, but the public school would have him starting Kindergarten.  He is just too advanced to hold back.

Don’t hold him back academically, but I would encourage you to keep him in the proper grade for his ‘future self’.  Don’t dumb down his work.  Many K’s are doing 1st-grade work, but come 3rd or 4th (or sometimes 9th) it becomes too difficult and they totally lose their self-worth as being ‘so smart’.

Label him the proper grade per age (we do this for kids who are behind grade level as well).

Teach at the level he is (above, at, behind grade level).

Tell him what a hard worker he is (but not that he is ‘so smart’)

Understand that he is and will continue to ‘play’ school until age 7, 8, or 9.  Be a fun playmate!

When it becomes real and no longer play is when you want to make sure there are no emotional wobbles due to labels or how proud you are reflecting your advanced student.

Never keep him at full speed/challenged/at potential, but rather move forward as he sets the tone with precept upon precept and concept upon concept.  Imagine if your husband said, “You are such a great wife that I expect you to work at your very best Top Notch day in and day out.”  Exhausting.  Overwhelming.  Draining.

Usually, a child will continue to be ahead in some subjects and fall behind in others as the years go along.  This is perfectly fine.  Completing all subjects of a specific grade level does not give validation or credence to work accomplished.  A year of math is a year of math even if only a portion of the textbook was covered.  You will complete the rest of it next year (or over the summer if you school year ‘round- such a lovely and relaxing approach to schooling!)

We have always made age 6 our K year.  My husband teaches in a college prep high school with tons of really bright kids who have been pushed ahead.  They are able to compete in the classroom, but not on the playing field or leadership as their bodies and emotions are still at the proper age.  And, it’s nice to graduate a man who is a bit more mature in age and wisdom than his peers…and we have loved having the extra year with them.

Dual Enrollment in South Carolina: Remain Calm and Don’t Panic

Maybe this wasn’t the case for you, but I always knew my eldest would start college early and from home. However, for the past year and a half I’ve struggled to find the right option for my student. Thinking it would ease my administrative burden and provide opportunities for dual enrollment, I enrolled him in a South Carolina online based public school from home. He excelled and finished his 10th grade year strong.

For the past year I have labored researching local schools that offered online courses. My son is 15 and not ready to drive to college on his own. What was I to do? Our local offerings were bleak; too far, too shady, or very few online class options. The internet based school he was enrolled in was of no help at all, the emails resulting in answers like ‘check with your local community college’. I was left wondering if I had misunderstood the role of a high school advisor…?? Eventually, my emails and phone calls were sucked into the black hole of non-response. Our advisor was no longer with the school, but of course, no one told us that. I was finally able to speak with another administrator and this is the plan she came up with.

  • 3 college courses through F-D Tech
  • 2 courses through their online public school due to testing requirements (no college credit and unnecessary)
  • 1 elective

I began to widen my search, realizing that our son should have access to any public college offering online schooling in South Carolina, I searched farther and farther out.  I found Florence-Darlington Technical College in Florence, SC. Florence-Darlington offers a complete online associates degree and dual enrollment for public OR homeschool students. Success! What could be better?! Well, I’ll tell you, they are easy to work with, answer emails and actually will return your call!

Since one 15 wk college course is equal to 1 year of high school study, our student only needs to take 3 classes per semester to complete his 11th grade year. Bringing him back under our homeschool association means that the hobbies he enjoys now, theater, fencing and guitar, will count towards his required electives. So, what does his schedule look like now?

  • 3 college courses online this fall and 3 spring of 2019 through Florence-Darlington
  • receives elective credit for his current activities

This is about  half the workload of keeping him in the online school, and half the time investment.

Once the lottery pays for half, his tuition will be around $900 a semester plus books. It’s an affordable college option and makes the most of his two remaining high school years, while keeping the grade keeping burden off of me. They also offer summer courses and intensives, which we will use next year as needed.

I hope our little journey and research can be helpful for others in our situation and provide a clear path forward. It’s not too late to register for fall classes! Consider contacting Florence-Darlington today and getting the ball rolling towards making the most of these last two years of high-school, while keeping them home, and keeping it simple!

-Anita Moree

Fort Mill, SC

Curriculum is a Tool, Not a Goal

As we excitedly plan out our learning and lessons for next year it strikes me how the butterfly-joy welling up from within is based on the journey rather than thoughts of the completion of another year.  It feels like running into a dear friend who has been out of town for a while.

In the beginning, I thought it was about getting through a long list of requirements year by year.  The concept of being able to fall into a lesson of intrigue and remain there for as long as we wished is foreign- feeling somehow that it must be wrong, illegal, something.

After years of following my heart instinct, experiences have confirmed, in multiple ways due to various and sundry children’s testing, attending school, going to college, etc. that this method works.  But, it still feels confusing to educate in such a non-traditional manner.

We use books- many books but rarely follow one all the way through as we don’t believe that gives a worldview from which to platform discussions.  We learn how to learn traditionally because that is the world we live in.  However, day to day lessons are fluid, aimed at my children’s future selves, built toward their interests and gifts.  Rarely are two days alike.

There is rhythm to each day, there is sequence to our lessons, there is beauty as well as tears, and there is trepidation that I’m missing something, I’m doing it wrong, I’m fooling myself.  God is giggling right now as He whispers in my hear, “Katie, my beloved, that is faith.  Trust.”